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NAFEMS Webinar Series

Practical Advice for Finite Element Analysis of Your Design

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Abstract

We can understand the progress in Finite Element Analysis methods over the last decade by considering:

·         Incredibly powerful computers now costing less than a microwave oven

·         Computer memory capacity bursting through the Windows 2 or 3 GByte barriers

·         Advances in numerical methods reducing solution times and improving I/O

·         CAD interfaces allowing seamless meshing and manipulation of the native geometry

So why can’t we just move to a ‘mesh what we see’ paradigm, press the button and let the computer do all the hard work of figuring out load paths, stress levels and result checking in the analysis of our designs.

The answer is that when we build and analyze a design using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method we have to make a whole series of assumptions about the real world structure and how we can best fit these into our simulation. Without a clear understanding of these assumptions and the limitations that will always exist in the FEA method then there is a real danger that our analysis will just not represent the real world conditions.

This webinar looks at some of the challenges facing an engineer when setting out on an FEA analysis and is particularly focused on the newcomer to the field who wants to do the job in an effective and efficient way. Practical guidelines, hints and tips are given based on the presenter’s 33 years in industry, FEA customer support and training.

This webinar is a condensed version of part of a full three day live class which is being presented by Tony Abbey in partnership with NAFEMS throughout the US. For more information on the related training courses, please visit: Intro to FEA Training Courses .

We would like to invite you to attend this webinar entitled “Practical  Advice for Finite Element Analysis ", which will be held on Thursday, February 26th , 2009 at 11:00am Eastern Standard Time (GMT -05:00, New York).

This webinar will address:

  • A sanity check on FEA – what it is and it is not
  • Understanding the objective of the analysis – why are we doing it?
  • Getting a clear view of the scope of the real world problem – how do we tackle it?
  • Looking critically at the CAD geometry model – how much can we use?
  • Why not use 20 million elements – let the computer take the strain?
  • Real world boundary conditions and loading – some examples of good and bad modeling
  • Anticipate the load paths – examples of how to produce free body diagrams to use as a sanity check on your models
  • Checking the results – FEA is guilty until proven innocent

 Add value to your product or company by attending this FREE webinar.


Agenda

Welcome & Introduction
Matthew Ladzinski, NAFEMS North America

Practical Advice for Finite Element Analysis of your Design
Tony Abbey, FETraining

Q & A Session


Details

Event Type: Webinar
Location: Online USA
Date: February 26, 2009

Webinar Presenter

Tony Abbey

FETraining

Tony Abbey has created and taught a wide range of FEA based training classes over the past 15 years. He has developed a reputation for providing the student with an experience that is full of insight gained from his extensive experience, but which also challenges and motivates. Tony has been working with FEA for over 30 years, both in Industry and for FEA software providers in the UK and the US. He currently runs his own FEA consultancy company.

His informal and interactive presentation style allows the key concepts to be taught in a manner which involves participants fully in the course material.

Tony presents papers at NAFEMS and other conferences on a regular basis and has been involved with NAFEMS since its formation.